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Jennifer Schack

Jennifer Schack

Reverend Theodore C. Kosse died on Tuesday, November 1, 2022, in Cincinnati, Ohio.  He was born on August 10, 1945, in Cincinnati, and baptized at St. Martin of Tours Parish, Cheviot (Cincinnati). He did his preparatory studies at St. Gregory Seminary and studied theology at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary of the West in Norwood, Ohio. He was ordained on May 29, 1971, at the Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains in Cincinnati by Archbishop Paul F. Leibold.

Father Kosse received his first assignment on June 17, 1971, as Assistant at St. Peter Parish, Dayton and part time faculty at Carroll High School, Dayton. On July 16, 1971, he was appointed Assistant Communications Coordinator for the northern section of the archdiocese.  On September 30, 1971, he was appointed Director of Public Relations, Radio and Television Programs within the archdiocese, Assistant Chaplain of the University of Cincinnati Newman Center (1971-1973) and Assistant at Assumption Parish, Walnut Hills (Cincinnati) (1971-1979). He was appointed full time to the diocesan Communications Office, effective June 20, 1973. On July 1, 1979, he was appointed in residence at St. Andrew Parish, Avondale (Cincinnati), while continuing as Director of Radio and Television.  On December 1, 1981, he was appointed Priest-Coordinator for the Community of Hope (a non-territorial parish) and Associate ad cautelam of St. Leo Parish, Cincinnati, while continuing as Director of Radio and Television and in residence at St. Andrew Parish.  Father Kosse was appointed Director of the Communications Office on January 9, 1987 (1987-1989).  He was appointed Pastor of St. Peter Parish, New Richmond on July 7, 1989. He was appointed to the College of Consultors in November 1990 until November 1995.  He was reappointed to another six-year term as Pastor of St. Peter Parish commencing on July 8,1995, and reappointed to the College of Consultors for another five year term from November 1995 until November 2000.  On July 1, 2000, he was appointed Pastor of Holy Trinity Parish, West Union, and St. Mary Queen of Heaven Parish, Peebles, for a period of six years.  He was appointed Dean of the St. Martin Deanery, effective January 1, 2001, for a four-year term, ending December 31, 2004, then reappointed for another four-year term ending December 31, 2008.  He was appointed Temporary Parochial Administrator of St. Mary Parish, Hillsboro, effective July 18, 2005.  Father Kosse was reappointed as Pastor of Holy Trinity and St. Mary Queen of Heaven Parishes for two additional six-year terms, commencing on July 1, 2006, and again on July 1, 2012.  Father Kosse retired from active ministry on July 1, 2014.

Deacon Robert Kozlowski, a Deacon of the Archdiocese, died on Wednesday, October 19, 2022 at the age of 76. Deacon Bob was ordained by Archbishop Daniel Pilarczyk for the Archdiocese of Cincinnati on September 28, 1991. He was assigned to St. Adalbert Catholic Church, Dayton, upon his ordination. He also later served at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, New Carlisle, and St. Peter Catholic Church, Huber Heights. He has served the Archdiocese as a permanent deacon for thirty-one years.

Deacon Bob leaves his wife, Barb, to whom he had been married for 54 years. Also surviving him are three sons and seven grandchildren. One son, William, preceded him in death.

Visitation will be on Thursday, October 27, 2022 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Marker & Heller Funeral Home, Huber Heights Chapel, 5844 Old Troy Pike. Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10 a.m. on Friday, October 28, 2022 at St. Peter Catholic Church, 6161 Chambersburg Road.

Please keep the repose of the soul of Deacon Robert Kozlowski in your prayers, as well as consolation for his wife, Barb, and their entire family.

You may read the entire obituary at this link: https://www.markerheller.com/obituary/RobertBob-Kozlowski

Oct. 12, 2022

 

Mr. Jerry Freewalt has resigned from his position as Executive Director of the Catholic Conference of Ohio and his resignation has been accepted by the bishops of Ohio. Mr. Freewalt has accepted the position of Director of the Office of Social Concerns with the Diocese of Columbus. The bishops of Ohio are very grateful for Mr. Freewalt’s dedicated service to the Catholic people and dioceses of Ohio and gratified that he will continue to serve the mission of the Church in his new capacity.

With Mr. Freewalt’s departure, the bishops of Ohio have asked Ms. Carolyn Jurkowitz to return as interim director of the Catholic Conference of Ohio effective immediately, and she has accepted. The bishops are grateful for her agreement to assist at this time.

The Catholic Conference of Ohio will begin a national search for a new Executive Director in the coming days.

 

Most Reverend Dennis M. Schnurr

Archbishop of Cincinnati

Chairman, Board of Directors,

CAtholic Conference of Ohio

God creates each human being in an act of divine love. As Catholics, we believe human life begins at conception and unfolds over the span of time we are given on this earth until our natural death. It is our firm hope that God, who created us in love and guides and sustains us by that same love throughout our lives, will also welcome us into eternity where we can rejoice in the presence of Love itself. Life in this world is our experience of being created, sustained and redeemed by God, and for this reason life is of the highest value. This is why we celebrate Respect Life Month each October. We thank God for the gift of life, and we renew our commitment to honor and promote the dignity of every person.

In his apostolic exhortation The Joy of the Gospel, Pope Francis reminds us, “Every human being is the object of God’s infinite tenderness, and he himself is present in their lives” (EG 274). Every person is loved by God. Every person reflects His presence. We are then called to also love each person. As the Lord said, “Love one another as I love you” (Jn. 15:12).

Jesus left us this new commandment of love on the night before He was to offer His life for the salvation of every human being. From the Cross, He teaches us that true love is sacrificial; it seeks the good of the other no matter the cost. Christian love, then, is selfless and for all. The Lord calls us to love not only our family members and friends, but also those who are alone, afraid and abandoned. He calls us to love the most vulnerable – the unborn and the infirm. We are called to love those who suffer from poverty, those who have fled their homeland due to war or persecution, and those who have been imprisoned, cast out from society and forgotten. The Lord even calls us to love our enemies.

On our own we cannot love as Christ loves, but we are capable of such love to the degree that we allow Christ to love through us. This is why a life of prayer, built upon the fruitful reception of the sacraments and the Scriptures, is essential for each one of us. We can accomplish great things united to the Lord.

This year we celebrate the first Respect Life Month after the overturning of Roe v. Wade. We know that the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization decision does not mark the conclusion of our efforts to promote and foster a culture of life. More than 65 million innocent children have lost their lives to abortion in the U.S. since Roe v. Wade. This sad fact demonstrates the desperate need for conversion of hearts and minds. We must continue to pray and work so that all people come to respect the inherent dignity and sacredness of every human being from conception to natural death.

We build such a culture which respects the gift of life through prayer, sacrifice and joyful service to all. Offering our love and support to pregnant women, especially those who are alone or overwhelmed, remains an important part of this work. Likewise, the compassion and assistance we provide for the sick and the needy gives testimony to our faith. Visiting and ministering to those in prison provides hope for those who often feel forgotten and rejected by society. Welcoming immigrants and helping them to begin a new life heals the scars of the tragedies they have left behind.

We have the opportunity to love every person we encounter as Christ has loved us. In so doing, we contribute to building a culture which truly respects each human life. May God sustain us in this endeavor!

Reverend Thomas M. Gaeke died on Tuesday, September 13, 2022 in Dayton, Ohio. He was born on March 20, 1948, in Dayton, and baptized at Holy Angels Church, Dayton. He did his preparatory studies at St. Gregory Seminary and studied Philosophy and Theology at Mount St. Mary Seminary of the West, Cincinnati. He was ordained on May 30, 1975, by Archbishop Joseph L. Bernardin at Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception Church, Dayton.

Father Gaeke received his first assignment on June 20, 1975, as associate at Our Lord Christ the King Parish, Mt. Lookout, and to teach at McNicholas High School, Cincinnati. On July 17, 1978, he was appointed associate at St. Thomas Moore Parish, Withamsville, and to continue teaching at McNicholas High School.  In September 1979, he was appointed Director of Central Services for the Archdiocese of Cincinnati and in February1980 he was appointed in residence at Saint Joseph Orphanage. He went on sabbatical in August 1985. On December 3, 1985, he was appointed associate at St. Ann Parish, Hamilton. He was appointed associate pastor of St. William Parish, Cincinnati, from September 4, 1990, to June 1, 1991. He was appointed temporary administrator of St. Michael Parish, Fort Loramie, effective July 9, 1991.  On September 20, 1991, he was appointed associate pastor at St. William Parish, Cincinnati.  He was appointed temporary administrator of Visitation Parish, Eaton, and St. John the Evangelist Parish, New Paris, on November 8, 1991. On January 24, 1992, he was appointed temporary administrator of Corpus Christi Parish, Dayton.  Father Gaeke was appointed pastor of St. Mary Parish, Dayton, on June 2, 1992, for a period of six years. On July 12, 1994, he was appointed temporary administrator of Resurrection Parish, Dayton, while continuing as pastor of St. Mary Parish.  Father Gaeke was appointed pastor of Holy Family Parish, Dayton, for a period of six years, effective June 8, 1995, while continuing as pastor of St. Mary Parish.  He was reappointed as pastor of St. Mary Parish, Dayton, for another six-year term, commencing on June 3, 1998. Father Gaeke was appointed temporary parochial vicar at Holy Redeemer Parish, New Breman, effective from August 16, 2001, through December 10, 2001.  Father Gaeke retired on April 1, 2013.

Reception of the Body: Tuesday, September 20, 2022, at 3:00 p.m. at St. Mary Church, 310 Allen Street, Dayton, Ohio 45410; (937-256-5633.) Celebrant: Reverend Anthony J. Geraci. Visitation: following Reception of the Body until 8:00 p.m.

Mass of Christian Burial: Wednesday, September 21, 2022, at 1:00 p.m. at St. Mary Church, Dayton. Celebrant: Most Reverend R. Daniel Conlon. Homilist: Monsignor William Schooler.

Burial: Wednesday, September 21, 2022, following the Mass of Christian Burial, at Calvary Cemetery, 1625 Calvary Drive, Dayton, Ohio 45409. (937-293-1221) Celebrant: Most Reverend R. Daniel Conlon.

“Run so as to win.” St. Paul wrote these words to the Christians at Corinth, a city with a large stadium and anchored in the centuries-old Greek athletic tradition. “Every athlete exercises discipline in every way. They do it to win a perishable crown, but we an imperishable one” (1 Cor. 9:24-25).

Sports and the Catholic spiritual life, perhaps surprisingly, have some significant aspects in common. Saints from the Apostle Paul to Pope St. John Paul II have taught us that focus, persistence and determination are as necessary to the faithful Christian witness as to the successful athlete. At the same time, participation in sports can nourish important human values.

Almost two millennia after St. Paul, at a Mass in Rome’s Olympic Stadium celebrating the Jubilee of Sports People on Oct. 29, 2000, Pope St. John Paul II used a similar sporting analogy. “Every Christian is called to become a strong athlete of Christ, that is, a faithful and courageous witness to His Gospel,” he said. “But to succeed in this, he must persevere in prayer, be trained in virtue, and follow the divine Master in everything.”

Perseverance is necessary for success at anything in life, Pope St. John Paul II pointed out. “Anyone who plays sports knows this very well: it is only at the cost of strenuous training that significant results are achieved. This is the logic of sport; it is also the logic of life: without sacrifices, important results are not obtained, or even genuine satisfaction.”

St. John Paul was, himself, an avid athlete who hiked and skied even after he became pope. In his 2000 speech, he thanked God for the gift of sports “in which the human person exercises his body, intellect and will, recognizing these abilities as so many gifts of the Creator.” And he noted that playing sports “can encourage young people to develop important values such as loyalty, perseverance, friendship, sharing and solidarity,” plus a healthy sense of competition. Most of all, sports teaches that the achievement of a goal, particularly a stretch goal, is the result of embracing everything that leads to obtaining that goal and rejecting those things that do not.

As Catholics, we are called to be saints. This is our ultimate goal. It is not the goal of an exceptional few or those living out a particular vocation. The universal call to holiness is at the very heart of one of the central documents of the Second Vatican Council, Lumen Gentium. “Therefore in the Church, everyone, whether belonging to the hierarchy or being cared for by it, is called to holiness, according to the saying of the Apostle: ‘For this is the will of God, your sanctification’” (LG 39). Just as an elite athlete orients his or her whole mental and physical life – training, nutrition, competitive psychology, skill development – to the end of athletic excellence and winning, so must we strive to orient all our thoughts, words and deeds to our ultimate end: holiness. Everything we do, every choice we make, moves us either closer to that goal or further from it.

Unlike athletic contests, the competition within ourselves between faith and doubt, virtue and vice, light and darkness, is one we must win. Fortunately, we are not alone in this contest. The Catholic Church, Christ’s sacramental presence on earth, imbued with the Holy Spirit, offers us everything we need to orient our lives to Christ. Among them are prayer, spiritual reading, Sacred Scripture and Tradition, the saints, the holy sacrifice of the Mass, the sacraments and adoration of our Lord in the Eucharist. These are gifts which we should not ignore.

When our time on this earth comes to its end, may we echo the words of St. Paul: “I have competed well; I have finished the race; I have kept the faith” (2 Tim. 4:7).

Deacon Paul Richardson, a Deacon of the Archdiocese, died on Sunday, August 7, 2022 at the age of 87. Deacon Paul was ordained with the very first ordination class in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, on September 25, 1976. He was assigned to St. Paul Catholic Church, Yellow Springs, upon his ordination and served there ever since. In June, 2004, he was also assigned to St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church in South Charleston. He has served the Archdiocese as a permanent deacon for forty-five years.

Deacon Paul served for 10 years as President of the National Association of Black Catholic Deacons and in 2005 was recognized with the Fr. Joseph Davis Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2013, he was among 6 Black Catholics honored for service to the Archdiocese with the prestigious Ministerial Award from Archbishop Schnurr.

Deacon Paul leaves his wife, Juanita, to whom he had been married for 65 years. Also surviving him are his daughters Natasha and Tonia, two grandsons, two brothers, three sisters and many nieces and nephews.

Reverend James R. Collins died on Friday, August 5, 2022, in Cincinnati, Ohio.  He was born on July 8, 1942, in Cincinnati. He did his preparatory studies at St. Gregory Seminary and studied theology at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary of the West in Norwood. He was ordained on May 25, 1968, at St. Peter in Chains Cathedral in Cincinnati by Auxiliary Bishop Edward A. McCarthy.

Father Collins received his first assignment on June 21, 1968, as assistant at St. Luke Parish, Dayton and to teach full time at Archbishop Alter High School, Dayton.  On August 26, 1971, he was appointed assistant at Immaculate Conception Parish, Dayton, and to continue teaching at Archbishop Alter High School.  On June 19, 1974, he was appointed assistant at St. Raphael Parish, Springfield and Principal of Catholic Central High School, Springfield.  On June 15, 1977, he was appointed pastor of Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Parish, Reading.  He was appointed pastor of St. Dominic Parish, Cincinnati on July 1, 1986.  On November 30, 1994, Father Collins was appointed Dean of the St. Lawrence Deanery for a four-year term.  He was appointed pastor of St. James of the Valley Parish, Cincinnati, effective July 27, 1998, and appointed to another six-year term as pastor of St. James of the Valley Parish, commencing on July 28, 2004.  Father Collins retired from active ministry on July 1, 2007.

Reverend Raymond C. Kellerman died on Sunday, August 7, 2022, in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was born on April 12, 1947, in Cincinnati. He did his preparatory studies at St. Gregory Seminary and studied theology at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary of the West. He was ordained on June 2, 1973, at St. Peter in Chains Cathedral, Cincinnati, by Archbishop Joseph L. Bernardin.

Father Kellerman received his first assignment on June 20, 1973, as assistant at St. Cecilia Parish, Oakley, and teacher at Purcell High School, Cincinnati. On December 27, 1977, he was appointed resident associate at St. Clare Parish, College Hill, while continuing on the faculty of Purcell High School. On July 1, 1979, he was appointed to the faculty of Our Lady of the Angels High School, St. Bernard, while continuing as resident associate at St. Clare Parish. On July 1, 1982, he was appointed associate at St. Susanna Parish in Mason, Ohio and then on November 12, 1984, Father Kellerman was appointed pastor of Nativity of Our Lord Parish in Pleasant Ridge (Cincinnati). In 1992 he was appointed to Graduate Studies in Canon Law and on June 1, 1994, he was appointed Judge in the Tribunal Office and to provide ministerial help at St. Bartholomew Parish, Springfield Township (Cincinnati). On September 1, 1995, Father Kellerman was appointed to the office of Adjutant Judicial Vicar for the Metropolitan Tribunal of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati; commencing in February 2001, he then continued to work with the Tribunal in a volunteer capacity and as Judge on the Appeal Court. On July 1, 2000, he was appointed pastor of Holy Trinity Parish, Norwood, where he served until his retirement in 2019. During his years of ministry, Father Kellerman also served as temporary administrator of the following parishes: St. Richard of Chichester, College Hill (1990), St. Bartholomew (1999), and Our Mother of Sorrows, Roselawn (Cincinnati) (2007); and as temporary associate pastor of the following: St. Therese, Little Flower, Mount Airy (1992) and St. Bartholomew (1992).