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Trenton Scroggins

Trenton Scroggins

Release Date: April 3, 2024

Media Release Concerning Marshall Hyzdu
 
Mr. Marshall Hyzdu has stepped down as president of Archbishop Moeller High School, effective today. We are grateful for Marshall’s many contributions to Moeller and extend our sincere best wishes for his success in future endeavors.
 
“It has been an honor and a joy to lead Archbishop Moeller High School for the past eight years. I am proud of our investment in academics, the arts, and athletics, and I am grateful for the opportunity to have been a part of the legacy of Moeller, alongside its outstanding community. I am also grateful to our board of trustees, our excellent faculty & staff, and students, and the strong supporters of the Moeller Family,” Hyzdu said. “My recent actions did not align with Moeller’s values or those of the Catholic Church. It is in the best interest of the Moeller community that I now step down to allow the school to continue to thrive without distraction.”

Since this is a personnel matter, no additional information will be made available.
 
The Moeller Board and the Archdiocese of Cincinnati will immediately begin a search for a new president with the objective of filling the position for the 2024-25 school year. Mr. Carl Kremer, currently principal, has agreed to serve as interim president during this transition.
 
 
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati is the 51st largest Catholic diocese in the country, with around 435,000 Catholics, and has the fifth largest Catholic school system in terms of enrollment with nearly 40,000 students.  The 19-county territory includes 208 canonical parishes organized into 57 Families of Parishes, and 113 Catholic primary and secondary schools.

Deacon William Mullaney, a deacon of the Archdiocese, died on March 17, 2024 at the age of 87. Deacon Bill was ordained by Archbishop Daniel Pilarczyk for the Archdiocese of Cincinnati on September 26, 1998. He served the Archdiocese as a permanent deacon for twenty-five years.

Upon his ordination, Deacon Bill was assigned to Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Anderson Township. He served faithfully at the parish throughout his entire ordained ministry.

Deacon Bill leaves his wife, Nancy, to whom he was married for 64 years. He also leaves their five children and their spouses, thirteen grandchildren and spouses, and four great-grandchildren.

Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Thursday, March 21, 2024 at 10:30 a.m. at Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church, 7820 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45255. There will be no visitation. A reception will be held immediately following the Mass in Heritage Hall at the church.

You may read the full obituary on the funeral home website here.

Please keep the repose of the soul of Deacon Bill Mullaney in your prayers, as well as peace and consolation for his entire family.

Deacon Manuel “Manny” Vilaboy, a deacon of the Archdiocese, died on March 3, 2024 at the age of 95. Deacon Manny was ordained by Archbishop Joseph Bernadin for the Archdiocese of Cincinnati on September 26, 1976. He was among the thirty-nine men ordained in the first permanent deacon ordination in the Archdiocese. He served the Archdiocese as a permanent deacon for forty-seven years.

Upon his ordination, Deacon Manny was assigned to St. Bartholomew Parish, Cincinnati. In 1983, he was assigned to minister to the Spanish-speaking community at Holy Angels Parish in Cincinnati. He was appointed Moderator of the Hispanic Catholic Community in the Cincinnati area in 1988 by Archbishop Daniel Pilarczyk. Deacon Manny was also dedicated to the Catholic Cursillo Movement of Cincinnati, serving as its Spiritual Director for many years until 2005.

Deacon Manny was married to his wife, Eileen, for 36 years before her death in April, 2020. They were the proud parents of eight children and fifteen grandchildren.

A memorial service will be held at Saint Mary Magdalene Church in Gilbert, Arizona, where he has been living with family for many years.  The memorial service will be on Monday, March 11th. Burial will take place at the Queen of Heaven Cemetery in Gilbert.

You may read his full obituary here.

Please keep the repose of the soul of Deacon Manuel Vilaboy in your prayers, as well as peace and consolation for his entire family.

Download PDF Version – English | Download PDF Version – Spanish

March 4, 2024

Dear brothers and sisters in Christ,

There is no doubt we live in polarized times.  Virtually every topic seems to be fodder for political division.  In such times, our Catholic faith can be tested even more intensely than usual, especially when our faith runs up against public policy.  Of course, Catholic teaching is not just for the United States in the 21st century; it is universal and enduring.  When we strive to live our Catholic faith and pursue the common good, our work can alternatively be praised or attacked … and sometimes both at the same time.

We experience this dynamic regularly in our advocacy for the unborn and pregnant mothers in need, for example.  Now, we are facing vitriolic backlash online and even in some mainstream media for our care for our migrant brothers and sisters who, like everyone else in our communities, are children of God.

Our nation has a broken immigration system.  Our nation’s migration and border policies fail us.  For decades, the U.S. Catholic bishops have urged Congress and administrations of both parties to revamp immigration law and processes in a way that restores order and promotes human dignity.  To be clear, this does not mean that we condone unlawful immigration or advocate for open borders.  However, in the midst of a broken system and broken world, we do always advocate for every person’s God-given dignity.

As faithful Catholics, we have a responsibility to carefully discern between provocative narratives and the truth of the Church’s work with migrants and refugees in need.  The objectification of any human being or set of human beings is not in keeping with the commandment to love one another.

Through our parishes, schools, and social services agencies in which migrants find themselves, the Church provides an opportunity for us to leave behind political agendas and offer the goodness of basic human interactions inspired by the faith and charity which come from God. Any of the thousands of volunteers and supporters who help make our humanitarian work possible can attest to the great gift this has provided for their own faith journeys and our communities. Working with migrants and refugees is a wonderful way to put our Catholic faith into action, just as is serving any other person in need.

The types of services for which migrants are eligible varies greatly depending on their immigration status.  In providing support for migrants and refugees, it is important to clarify what the Church does and does not do, especially through our local charitable agencies, Catholic Charities Southwestern Ohio and Catholic Social Services of the Miami Valley.
  • We provide humanitarian assistance to anyone who comes through our doors should we have a service for them.  This may involve food assistance, case management and mental health counseling, all supported through private philanthropy.
  • We do not aide or assist in any unauthorized entry into the United States.
  • We provide legal refugee resettlement.  This federal program, which has existed for over 40 years, partners with local agencies to resettle those who have been identified by the United Nations and thoroughly vetted by the U.S. government.  “Refugee” is a formal designation given to a minority of U.S. migrants who have demonstrated a well-founded fear of persecution for their race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in a particular social group.  When a refugee is qualified for permanent resettlement, it is established through multiple federal agencies that they cannot return to their country of origin and that they pose no threat to our national security.  Our agencies transparently receive federal and local funds to assist in this work.
  • We provide case management services to unaccompanied minors to ensure that they are safe and free from exploitation and human trafficking.  Those children that receive these services are placed by the federal government in our area, and we have no role in directing them here.  Our Catholic Charities is assigned their cases and receives federal funds to assist in this work as well.

If you have a concern about immigration law or practice, please address it with your government representatives. But always remember your deepest calling as Christians: “whatever you did for one of these least brothers [and sisters] of mine, you did for me” (Matthew 25:40).

Sincerely yours in Christ,

Most Reverend Dennis M. Schnurr

Archbishop of Cincinnati

P.S. If you would like to learn more about this topic, please consult the following resources:

Release Date: Feb. 9, 2024

Media Release Concerning Seminarian Broderick Witt

The following email was sent to the seminary community this afternoon by Father Anthony Brausch, Rector of Mount St. Mary’s Seminary & School of Theology. We have no further comment at this time due to the ongoing nature of the below referenced investigation.

 

To: Seminarians, Faculty, and Staff,

I am writing to let you know that this morning officers of the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Department were on the grounds to interview Mr. Broderick Witt and to execute a search warrant on his living quarters. Mr. Witt has been taken into custody by the sheriff. The officers informed me that Mr. Witt would be charged with pandering sexually oriented material involving a minor.

Mr. Witt is no longer a student of this institution, nor a seminarian for the Archdiocese of Cincinnati.

The seminary and the Archdiocese of Cincinnati have strict policies against, and take significant precautions to prevent, anyone from possessing or accessing material of this type, regardless of whether they are a student, faculty, or staff.  Discovery of such material will result in immediate termination or dismissal and notification of law enforcement.

We have cooperated, and will continue to cooperate, fully with law enforcement and the prosecutor’s office.  We are committed to doing all we possibly can to remove the scourge of child exploitation and abuse from our Church and society.

Rev. Anthony R. Brausch, Rector

 

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati is the 51st largest Catholic diocese in the country, with around 435,000 Catholics, and has the fifth largest Catholic school system in terms of enrollment with nearly 40,000 students.  The 19-county territory includes 208 canonical parishes organized into 57 Families of Parishes, and 113 Catholic primary and secondary schools.

 

Jennifer Schack

Director of Media Relations

Archdiocese of Cincinnati

Office | 513.263.6618

Cell | 859.512.5626

[email protected]

Download PDF Version – English | Download PDF Version – Spanish

In his homily for the opening of the 13th Ordinary General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops, Pope Benedict XVI said, “The Church exists to evangelize. Faithful to the Lord Jesus Christ’s command, his disciples went out to the whole world to announce the Good News, spreading Christian communities everywhere” (Homily, Oct. 7, 2012). The Catholic Church is thus missionary in nature, responding to the Great Commission given by the Lord to His apostles as He ascended into heaven: “Go and make disciples of all nations” (Mt. 28:19).

Jesus sends His followers out. He did not envision a community of believers focused inward on itself or content remaining within the safety and comfort of the walls of their churches. That same desire of the Lord still holds. He calls us to share the Good News of salvation. This is not done through the repetition of doctrine or by quoting paragraphs from a catechism. A disciple is one who has heard the call of the Lord and responds to that call by choosing to conform his or her life daily to the teachings and example of Jesus. A disciple heeds the Lord’s command to take up one’s cross and follow Him. Ultimately, a disciple attracts others to discipleship by inviting them to know and follow Jesus through prayer, the Scriptures and the Sacraments. Everything we do as a Church should support the mission given to us by Jesus to make and form disciples.

This missionary impulse distinguishes the Church from charitable organizations and social clubs. We would do well to constantly evaluate whether the many activities that typically take place in our parishes support the evangelizing mission of the Church. Each of the services, programs and events we run through our parish communities ought to have the goal of bringing people closer to Christ and helping them with the daily work of converting their hearts and minds to the Lord. If we find ourselves engaged in parish endeavors that don’t support this work, then we run the risk of losing sight of the mission Christ has called us to share with Him.

While there are many ways at the parish or archdiocesan level in which we work together to fulfill the evangelizing mission of the Church, our individual pursuit of holiness also comes into play. The more united each of us is to Christ, the greater the effects of His grace, including our witness to others.

Pope Benedict also reflected on the importance of striving for personal holiness in his homily for the synod’s opening in 2012. He said holy people “are the true actors in evangelization in all its expressions. In a special way they are even pioneers and bringers of the new evangelization: with their intercession and the example of lives attentive to the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, they show the beauty of the Gospel to those who are indifferent or even hostile, and they invite, as it were tepid believers, to live with the joy of faith, hope and charity, to rediscover the taste for the word of God and for the sacraments, especially for the bread of life, the Eucharist… Holiness is not confined by cultural, social, political or religious barriers. Its language, that of love and truth, is understandable to all people of good will and it draws them to Jesus Christ, the inexhaustible source of new life.”

Through our individual pursuit of holiness and our work together as a Church, may we always dedicate ourselves to the Great Commission of bringing others to know, love and follow the Lord!

Release Date:  Jan. 31, 2024

Yearly Appeal Expects to Raise $5.5 million for Local Ministries

Archbishop Dennis M. Schnurr of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati kicked off the annual Catholic Ministries Appeal (CMA) earlier this month. The CMA is a chance to support six local ministries throughout the archdiocese, that teach, feed and heal thousands. It is one example of the generous ways that local Catholics give back to the community. Some of the ministries supported by the CMA include Catholic Charities Southwestern Ohio, Catholic Social Services of the Miami Valley, Prison Ministry, Hospital Ministry, and Campus Ministry. All donations to the CMA remain within the Archdiocese of Cincinnati helping local ministries.

“We hear in the gospel that Jesus looks out over the crowds and sees the many needs of the people. Through the Catholic Ministries Appeal, we see those needs, and we want to address those needs,” said Archbishop Schnurr.

Last year the CMA brought in more than $6 million and through the CMA more than 300,000 meals were served to the poor and more than 40,000 visits were made to patients in hospitals. This year the collection goal for the CMA is $5.5 million.

Seminary and vocation formation are also ministries supported by the CMA. As seminary enrollment at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary & School of Theology continues to be high, financial assistance is an important component to assuring thorough formation and support for men fulfilling their vocation in the Church.

“The Catholic Ministries Appeal is the visible way that people from across the archdiocese come together to ensure that the corporal works of mercy are being lived out in our community, “said David Kissell, Director of Stewardship.

In addition to outreach ministries, the CMA also supports 100 retired priests as well as ministries that help in Christian formation.  These include St. Rita School for the Deaf and the Center for the New Evangelization, which provides programing for marriage preparation, youth and young adults, parish evangelization, and Hispanic ministry.

For more information or to donate, visit: www.CatholicAOC.org/CMA.

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati is the 51st largest Catholic diocese in the country, with around 435,000 Catholics, and has the fifth largest Catholic school system in terms of enrollment with nearly 40,000 students.  The 19-county territory includes 206 canonical parishes organized into 57 Families of Parishes, and 109 Catholic primary and secondary schools.

Jennifer Schack

Director of Media Relations

Archdiocese of Cincinnati

Office | 513.263.6618

Cell | 859.512.5626

[email protected]

Deacon Greg Cecere, a deacon of the Archdiocese, died on January 20, 2024 at the age of 77. Deacon Greg was ordained by Archbishop Daniel Pilarczyk for the Archdiocese of Cincinnati on June 20, 1987. He served the Archdiocese of Cincinnati as a permanent deacon for thirty-six years.

Upon his ordination, Deacon John was assigned to Our Lady Queen of Peace Parish at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. During his time there, he was a member of the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA. This assignment continued through July, 1993. He was assigned to the Queen of Apostles Catholic Community in Dayton in 1999.

A Mass of Christian Burial and interment will be held at a future date on the Mount St. John property in Beavercreek , expected to be in April, 2024. The deacon community will be notified when the details are known.

You may read Deacon Greg’s full obituary here.

Please keep the repose of the soul of Deacon Greg Cecere in your prayers.

Release Date:  January 24, 2024

Catholic Schools Week 2024: Jan. 28 – Feb. 3

Catholic school students, teachers, and communities throughout the 19-county Archdiocese of Cincinnati will be celebrating the 50th annual Catholic Schools Week from January 28 through February 3 under the theme, “Catholic Schools: United in Faith and Community.” The 109 Catholic elementary and high schools in the archdiocese will mark the week with special programs, such as open houses, out-of-uniform days, service projects, Masses, talent shows, special decorations, student-faculty games and entertainment. Catholic Schools Week is an opportunity to celebrate the distinguished history of excellence of our Catholic schools and to pray for God’s blessings upon our school communities.

Monday: Archbishop Dennis M. Schnurr will participate in the yearly teleconference conversation with high school students in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. All 23 Catholic high schools will be given the opportunity to ask questions to Archbishop Schnurr. The teleconference will be broadcasted live at each of the high schools and on social media, including the Catholic Schools – Archdiocese of Cincinnati Facebook page.

Tuesday: The annual Catholic Schools Week Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Peter in Chains is at 10 A.M. Archbishop Dennis M. Schnurr will celebrate the Mass with more than a dozen priests expected to concelebrate. Students from more than 75 catholic schools in the Cincinnati area are invited. As tradition, a parade of banners representing each school present will take place at 9:40 A.M., before the Mass begins. Media members are invited to attend the Mass.

Wednesday: The annual Catholic Schools Week Mass near Dayton will be at St. Charles Borromeo Church in Kettering at 10 A.M. Archbishop Dennis M. Schnurr will celebrate the Mass with other priests concelebrating. Schools in the greater Dayton area will be represented with their attendance and through serving in the liturgy. Media members are invited to attend the Mass.

The Catholic Schools Office of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati is working on behalf of Catholic Schools to inform prospective families about the legislative changes to the Ohio EdChoice Expansion Scholarship Program. The changes, effective July 2023, mean that all Ohio students are now eligible to receive an EdChoice Expansion Scholarship. Scholarship amounts vary depending on income levels with a maximum amount of more than $6,000 for elementary students and more than $8,400 for high school students. The changes in legislation make an exceptional Catholic Education more affordable for all. To learn more, go to www.catholicbestchoice.org.

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati is the 51st largest Catholic diocese in the country, with around 435,000 Catholics, and has the fifth largest Catholic school system in terms of enrollment with nearly 40,000 students.  The 19-county territory includes 206 canonical parishes organized into 57 Families of Parishes, and 109 Catholic primary and secondary schools.

Jennifer Schack

Director of Media Relations

Archdiocese of Cincinnati

Office | 513.263.6618

Cell | 859.512.5626

[email protected]